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PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 6:21 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:36 pm
Posts: 2
Just posted this on the Bullseye Forum; repeating here given all of your experience shooting Pardinis and other European pistols. So, I bought a Pardini a couple of weeks ago and am struggling to get comfortable with the ortho grip (and have declining scores to prove it). I think I've acclimated mostly to the grip angle--I no longer have major adjustment issues switching back to my 1911 slabs for .45--but I have a very unsteady hold. It seems like all of my muscle twitches--heretofore unnoticed when shooting a 1911--are transferring in a major way to my Pardini hold. There's lots of movement, particularly during the trigger pull, that I just haven't experienced before. Perhaps I'm gripping too hard or not hard enough? Scores are starting to go back up, maybe it's just a settling in period and I have to accept the learning curve... Anyone else have similar experiences they can speak to shooting european .22's or ortho grips in general, and hopefully some suggestions on ways to overcome this? I must say, shooting this thing during sustained fire is an absolute joy in terms of feeling virtually zero recoil. I couldn't believe all the "extra" time I had in rapid fire... Now I just need to stop the excessive movement! Many thanks in advance!


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PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 9:57 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2008 4:20 pm
Posts: 4774
Location: Scottsdale AZ
Stop playing "pocket pool."


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PostPosted: Wed May 10, 2017 11:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 9:09 pm
Posts: 78
Rover wrote:
Stop playing "pocket pool."



Hey, I was just counting my loose change!

I have had issues with a pistol where I was not staying in the black. Not just the occasional wanderer, but target-of-shame material. It always felt I was 'straining' to release the trigger - it felt something like you describe...as if too many muscles in my hand seem to be straining to engage the trigger. I attributed it to a grip that was too small and a trigger that was engaging to far back. I went to a larger grip and adjusted the trigger shoe quite a bit forward and that changed everything. The strain was no longer there so pressing the trigger was now effortless, the rest of my hand remained neutral, and I could keep my shots in the black. I also find I'm better with an upswept palm shelf, FWIW. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.


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PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 4:48 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2008 4:26 am
Posts: 689
Location: Australia
I have this same problem, all control goes to crap with a standard Pardini grip, I made my own grips with a less steep rake. I think Italians have different physiology to everyone else.

One tip, keep your head upright, bring your shoulder up and tuck it under your ear - the grip angle won't seem so radical.

I can't find the greatest pictures but its more or less the difference between these two.
It can be awkward and inconsistent but an advantage is muzzle lift is reduced further. Don't drop your head though.

Image

Image


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PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 6:48 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2008 4:20 pm
Posts: 4774
Location: Scottsdale AZ
I had a set of modified Morini's on my .45. Worked well.


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PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 12:26 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 12, 2013 7:48 am
Posts: 443
Location: Aotearoa/NZ
1.5kg weight (milk jug) attached to a length of rope wound around a bit of broomhandle. Hold it out arms stretched. Palms down. Wind it up and down slowly from ground to shoulder height.

10 reps x 3. Twice a day, 3-4 times a week until you can strike with the force of a thousand suns.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRf49fMVOLE

Rink makes one if you have cash to splash.
https://www.formgriffe.de/shpSR.php?A=118&p1=400&p2=308

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PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 9:38 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2004 6:04 pm
Posts: 1346
Location: Massachusetts
This exercise was made famous (?) in the movie "Hannie Caulder", where Rachel Welch is taught to be a gunfighter by Robert Culp:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjkifyQ4NiU

The relevant bit starts at 1:07 & ends at 1:22


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PostPosted: Sat May 20, 2017 12:38 am 
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Joined: Fri May 20, 2016 1:03 am
Posts: 67
I have 2 Benelli MP90Ss and borrowed a friends Pardini for a while. Both have the extreme grip angle. I seem to be used to it (?), but do not shoot either of them as well as my GSP Expert which has a more upright grip (all have the orthopedic grips). I love orthopedic grips, for me, it is the grip angle. Have you (or can you) try a GSP or 208? Both are much closer in grip angle to a 1911. Also, Dick Horton (and perhaps others) makes an orthopedic grip for a Pardini with a 1911 grip angle.

Just FWIW, my coach would almost assuredly say to get more "dry fire' practice.

JoeW wrote:
Just posted this on the Bullseye Forum; repeating here given all of your experience shooting Pardinis and other European pistols. So, I bought a Pardini a couple of weeks ago and am struggling to get comfortable with the ortho grip (and have declining scores to prove it). I think I've acclimated mostly to the grip angle--I no longer have major adjustment issues switching back to my 1911 slabs for .45--but I have a very unsteady hold. It seems like all of my muscle twitches--heretofore unnoticed when shooting a 1911--are transferring in a major way to my Pardini hold. There's lots of movement, particularly during the trigger pull, that I just haven't experienced before. Perhaps I'm gripping too hard or not hard enough? Scores are starting to go back up, maybe it's just a settling in period and I have to accept the learning curve... Anyone else have similar experiences they can speak to shooting european .22's or ortho grips in general, and hopefully some suggestions on ways to overcome this? I must say, shooting this thing during sustained fire is an absolute joy in terms of feeling virtually zero recoil. I couldn't believe all the "extra" time I had in rapid fire... Now I just need to stop the excessive movement! Many thanks in advance!


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