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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:01 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 11:48 pm
Posts: 28
Location: San Clemente, CA
I've got a young shooter (just turned 6) and an Avanti 499 with his name on it (and a Remington 514T and a Savage 24C and...and...)

I'd really like to indoctrinate him early in competitive shooting (he's got 2 brothers too); are there good programs developed for young shooters to start from?


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:12 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2004 1:34 pm
Posts: 685
Location: White Sulphur Springs, MT, USA
He's the same age my son started at. Be sure to let him shoot when he is ready, and not force more shots (bulls) per session than he wants to shoot.

Sometimes he'll shoot a lot, sometimes one target and done. Very short attention span at that age.

I used the (very) ols 4 P system. 10 targets (5 shots) of 45 or better over a rest, before going to prone with sling. After ten targets of 45 or better with the sling, we went to sitting, and again 10 targets of 45+. Next kneeling, 10 targets 40+, and finally standing 10 targets 40+. The carrot at the end was his own 22. (I had a 521 cut down).

Took about 2-2 1/2 years for the full program, shooting AT HIS request. The BB gun went in with all the other rifles, and could only come out when he asked. Treated like all the "real" guns. Of course safety rules were reinforced every session.

He did well. Eventually won a couple state championships (Air Rifle and 4), and still has the BB gun (Daisy 499). On the sad side, he went over to the "dark side" and is now an air pistol shooter.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 11:09 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 5:17 pm
Posts: 56
Location: Colorado
That's a great age to start shooting.
Some thoughts for your consideration.

I found that the QB78 is a great airgun to use to teach kids (and adults!) about guns and safety before going to firearms.
Its bolt action is identical to a firearm making the transition smooth, but more importantly, easy to teach a consistent safe manual of arms.
It's single shot with iron sights making it easier to train new shooters with.
Young kids and easily cock and load it while you teach safe operation and can control the pellets.
It's all wood and steel- no plastic and can be passed down generations.
It uses one or two CO2 carts, or can be bought in a QB79 version that uses paintball tanks or remote for hours of endless shooting.

It's very easy to work on yourself.
Replacement stocks are inexpensive (about$30) so it is relatively painless to cut one up (slices off the back) to fit a young shooter (important).
You can always add the slices back as they grow or just buy a new stock.
Lots of aftermarket, relatively inexpensive, support (in my recommended priority, 2 stage trigger, hammer debounce for increased efficiency and less noise, power valve job).

It's an improved clone of the Crosman 160 discontinued in 1971.
Too bad Crosman doesn't make them anymore. I've got a Crosman 160, a QB78, and QB 79.
I like the QB79 for all the options available for the CO2 powerplant.
http://www.archerairguns.com/QB79-Chine ... ibqb79.htm

I'd recommend the .22 over the .177 as it's easier for kids to handle the pellets and makes fun targets in the backyard jump more.
Plastic toy animals make for a great safari hunt in the backyard. Shoot safely minding what's behind the targets.
This also often keeps kids and adults interested longer than shooting just paper targets.
Keep it safe, fun, and interesting at that age. I would set up a safari hunt in the backyard, and my kids would soon come out an join me without any prodding.

****The QB78 is my go gun whenever I introduce a new shooter to shooting****

It's a great way to introduce people to the sport before before pulling out the fun $tuff: Daisy 753, 853, 953, ZM2002, FWB Mod 2, LP5, LP10E, Career 707, HW30S/R7, HW95/R9, RWS 34, Benjamin 392 ($135.15-$20 discount upon checkout $115.15 shipped on Amazon Prime today--Really Great Deal!- I must resist!)

Personally, I don't like BB's because they ricochet and bounce back too much. Be sure to always wear eye protection.

Have fun!

Chris
PS. The safety reminders are just a habit from coaching.
PPS. My kids started shooting balloons it the backyard with an IZH-46 that I would hold (under the barrel) for them. They would grip and aim (the laser) when they were 4 years old.
Lots of fun. They graduated to their own Daisy 953s which I would cock for them. Now they are 15 and 17 and shooting club 10m pistol twice a week. The lessons about persistence, forgetting the past shot, focusing on the future, positive mental attitude and imagery, working consistently daily, etc. all carry on over positively to the schoolwork and life which is more important to me than their scores (which is what they are focused on LOL).


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 11:15 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 5:17 pm
Posts: 56
Location: Colorado
Just wanted to add that Pat's advice is right on target!

My kids went to the "dark side" because they didn't like all the rifle kit---and another coach (not me!) told them that
pistol shooters can transition to become rifle shooters, but rifle shooters almost never can become pistol shooters.
Something about missing the support of the straightjacket.....
LOL
Chris


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2015 11:57 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 2:49 pm
Posts: 2275
Location: Valencia County 4-H, NM USA
Chris__Colorado wrote:
---and another coach (not me!) told them that
pistol shooters can transition to become rifle shooters, but rifle shooters almost never can become pistol shooters.
Something about missing the support of the straightjacket.....
LOL
Chris

Yup Nick Mowrer & Will Brown defy that statement


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2015 8:57 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 12:00 am
Posts: 72
Location: Banks County, Georgia
I started both my sons on 8" metal discs hanging from trees in the back yard. These were hanging at varying distances, 25 feet out to about 75. These targets gave a nice shallow "Ping!" so everyone knew a "hit". We shot from the comfort of the porch, me doing the cocking and BB selection, him doing all the shooting. All homework had to be finished, and the gun was locked up until that time.

It was difficult enough where they couldn't hit the nearest target at first, then learned breathing and trigger control. The whole accent was on FUN, with no pressure to shoot. They had to ask to shoot. All hits earned a hearty "Good hit!" We celebrated with ice creams when scores were good for either boy. It was a celebration of the sport. Both boys enjoyed it immensely and shoot today.

Of course, my accent was on enjoyment rather than performance. The pressure to perform came later from within for each boy. And they did.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2015 5:41 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2015 2:02 pm
Posts: 48
Location: Madison County, Georgia
I think the NRA age rules for competition is 8yo. May want to double check that, because I think they may have revised it. Don't let that stop you from getting started now.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2016 4:03 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2012 8:23 pm
Posts: 58
Location: Nebraska, U.S.A.
CowsEarShooter wrote:
I've got a young shooter (just turned 6) and an Avanti 499 with his name on it (and a Remington 514T and a Savage 24C and...and...)

I'd really like to indoctrinate him early in competitive shooting (he's got 2 brothers too); are there good programs developed for young shooters to start from?



A mature 8 year old is an easy start. An Immature 8 year old is a huge headache in 4 position. on 8 inch paper plates in the pasture, not a problem.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2016 6:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2004 10:31 am
Posts: 112
The Jaycees have a bb-gun program that is great and will lead into other areas as they get older. Check them out locally. Also, try to get him into a good junior club with some good coaches and get them into competition as soon as they and you think they can handle it. Welcome into the sport and have fun!!!! Don in Oregon


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