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PostPosted: Mon Oct 24, 2016 11:28 pm 
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Location: Gainesville, Florida
I happened to use a bright light to check the condition of the rear shock absorber in my Pardini SPBE. I observed a "small" crack and thought it prudent to order and replace. The manual does not indicate how often the absorbers should be changed or even how to do it, but the "small" crack indicated a change was needed. Changing the unit is straight forward.

Just push out the old shock absorber out from the rear of the frame (grip must be removed). I used a 1/2" dowel to install the new one by adhering it with some grease to hold it on the end a dowel; after a few tries I got it lined up correctly.

In the attached image you can see the "small crack" I saw (Fig. A) and the following image (Fig. B) shows actual damaged done to the absorber. Needless to say, boy am I ever glad I checked. I would hate to hear what the bolt hitting metal sounds like.

I bought the pistol in late April 2014 and estimate that I've put ~8400 22 lr. rounds through it (all standard velocity), plus another 2300+ 32 ACPs (~850 or less fps). Since both barrels use the same frame, the shock absorber does double duty. I consider this normal (maybe even light) use for a BE shooter. Considering the popularity of this pistol among BE shooters and the recency of its availability in the U.S., I suggest every owner shine a strong light down the frame to examine the condition of this important part.

Most damage to the absorber is done by the rear of the dampening rod (part 770, the semicircular extension on right of real bolt), which is only on the 22 lr barrel. The lower figure (B) shows the back of the worn absorber and actual the extent of the damage. Scary. Happy Halloween, dipnet


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Pardini SPBE_recoil absorber_sm.jpg
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2016 8:01 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 8:27 pm
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Location: Utah
Dipnet,

Good post. I checked mine and no problem yet but I've shot less than half the rounds you have.

Question, do you know of some good instructions to fully disassemble an SP? Do you fully disassemble your SP to clean the internals? I'm concerned about cleaning lubricating the trigger, sear, etc.

David


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2016 8:30 am 
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Location: Mineola, TX
UtahDave wrote:
Dipnet,

Good post. I checked mine and no problem yet but I've shot less than half the rounds you have.

Question, do you know of some good instructions to fully disassemble an SP? Do you fully disassemble your SP to clean the internals? I'm concerned about cleaning lubricating the trigger, sear, etc.

David


I use Break Free gun scrubber in a spray can to clean the trigger group, then lube with spray Break Free CLP.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2016 9:54 am 
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Remember to make sure that you have some unsolidified moly grease on your sear. That was a problem I had last year with reset and Alex from Pardini diagnosed it very quickly at Perry.

Mike


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2016 3:10 pm 
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Location: Gainesville, Florida
Ever since I first smelled Hoppe's No. 9, I've thought it would make an excellent aftershave or possibly an aperitif. So I suppose I am preconditioned to like cleaning guns.

I have never broken down my pistol completely and have, with atypical discipline, resisted the temptation to start pushing pins out from the frame to see what happens. With the grip off, you can access many of the inner recesses of the frame and clean these areas using the little pointed q-tips (found at drug stores). I also have some small brushes that look like those little flossing brushes (but much bigger). I saw these in my doctor's office and begged four off him. Besides the obvious cleaning of barrel, I use a tiny dab of the moly grease sold by Pardini for the sear/hammer engagement (round window on right side of frame with grip off) as well on the disconnector/hammer engagement (round window on left side of frame with grip off). If you are shooting regularly, you only need to do the lubrication of these areas about every 6 months (IMHO).

My favorite gun lubricant that I use on the bolt's top and inside and on the top and bottom of the bolt's frame is a thin coat of Slide Glide (also use on 45 frame rails and any other firearm's obvious friction surfaces). This stuff sticks, lasts, and smoothly lubricates any rubbing metal surfaces.

Vladimir encouraged me to mess with it the trigger and learn how it functions. I pass this on; after all, Pardini owner's paid a lot of money for a target pistol with all these features, use them. The best instructions for doing this posted on the late Don Nygord's website (http://www.australiancynic.com/NYGORD.htm#_Adjusting_Pardini_SP/HP). I've got my trigger where the 1st stage is about 2 lbs and the 2nd stage about 1/2 pound, and crisp. The pre-second stage stacking is smooth and very distinct, so it is very easy to pull-through. The single trigger setting is legal for both 22, centerfire, and obviously international.

Keep adjusting all the screws and dry fire until you understand how the screws affect trigger pull. I have set the second stage release about at the beginning of the last third of the trigger's entire arc. Prior to his, I had the final hammer release near the end of the trigger's entire arc, but noticed I was tending to shoot a little low. Vladimir encouraged me to mess with the trigger and said I couldn't hurt it. Fear not, if you get the trigger to the point where it doesn't work, the instructions explain why that is.

I've a attached the 4th iteration of a summary on adjusting the SP trigger, compiled from the manual, Don Nygord's notes, and including excellent illustrations and diagrams by Doug C. White. I initially did this for myself, but thought others might find it useful; constructive criticism would be appreciated. Cheers, dipnet


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Trigger Adjustment_Pardini SP.pdf [274.52 KiB]
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2016 11:05 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 8:27 pm
Posts: 29
Location: Utah
Thanks for the great advice and write up. I will read it tonight. One more question.

I am having too many failure to ejects, at least one every box of ammo. I keep the bolt face and barrel chamber area clean and am only shooting Eley Club. I put a small drop of oil on the first round, at least for the first clips. I wonder if the clips need some gentle adjusting like the ones on my 32 ACP barrel did but which way?

I guess I should call Pardini and speak with Alex.

Cheers

David


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2016 11:17 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2005 11:07 am
Posts: 223
Location: Mineola, TX
FWIW, I have had a SP firing pin break and a buffer shred to pieces that clogged up the trigger assembly. I now keep a spare firing pin and spare buffers with me at matches.
Also, the SP trigger can be adjust to make an excellent roll trigger.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2016 4:02 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2004 6:43 pm
Posts: 971
One thing to watch for on the trigger, a nunber of times I have had to fix trigger
weights and found the tail of the first stage spring not located in screw PP.
The bend in the spring tail fits into a hole drilled up in screw PP.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2016 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2005 2:48 am
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Location: New Zealand
Dipnet wrote:
Most damage to the absorber is done by the rear of the dampening rod (part 770, the semicircular extension on right of real bolt), which is only on the 22 lr barrel. The lower figure (B) shows the back of the worn absorber and actual the extent of the damage. Scary. Happy Halloween, dipnet


When I upgraded my SP RF bolt to the later on with the damper rod at the back I was told that I should remove the green buffer and use it without. Reason being that the damper rod does the job of the green buffer.

You should check with Pardini on this as it seems that the damage in your pic is caused but the damper rod hitting the plastic buffer.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2016 1:57 am 
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Location: Gainesville, Florida
UtahDave,
Yes, asking Alex would be the best bet, especially since you are shooting Eley Club (should be no issues there). I mostly shoot CCI SV, but also SK Magazine, SK+, SK Pistol Match Special (in model 41 because hotter round has way fewer hiccups, stovepipes). I just tried Lapua Pistol King; it's very accurate, chronographed in the low 900s (sd was only 5.0), and the recoil was, well, laughable. I may buy a brick and use it for the big matches.

The only ammo I've ever had to sell was Fiocchi, the cheaper SV stuff; it was too long to reliably feed in the SP magazine. Of all the rounds I've fired in the SP, I've had just one stovepipe and that seems to be on par with the other Pardini shooters I've talked with.

I wish Pardini would make YouTube videos depicting common maintenance procedures. Given the design of the pistol, I suspect most maintenance tasks are simple, but would like the info prior to tapping out pins on my expensive pistol. I commend the tremendous online tutorial support by Steyr for their air pistols, a big time service.

Regarding the shock absorber, I don't see an obvious solution since I shoot both 22 and 32 using same frame and scope in the same match; doesn't make sense having to change shock absorber along with caliber changes. Cheers, dipnet                                                                                                       


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2016 12:28 am 
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Because I shoot I shoot both 22 lr and 32 ACP with my SPBE, Alex Chichkov recently confirmed that I should remove the dampening rod (part 770), rod pin (769), and the dozen or so O-rings (771) that occur behind the dampening rod in the in 22 lr bolt. The dampening rod is not found on the 32 ACP bolt. The clear cause of damage to the rear recoil absorber was caused by the dampening rod slamming into the rubber absorber (see photo).

The dampening rod is easily removed from the 22 lr bolt by punching out the retaining pin (the one closest to the rod) with appropriate punch on a bench block. After you remove the rod, pull out the first 2 or 3 O-rings using the punch and most of the remaining rings can be gently tapped out, likely except for the last stubborn one. Alex cautioned that the rear recoil absorber should be checked annually for possible damage and replaced as needed (depending on how much you shoot). I reconsidered estimated ammo shot since buying the pistol in spring 2014 and suspect 22 lr is ~4000 rounds or less plus ca 2000 rounds of 32 ACP. Now it is easier to lock the slide back in 22 lr.

In the attached image, you can easily see where the rear of the recoil dampening rod had impacted the rear recoil absorber. Best, dipent


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Pardini SPBE_recoil absorber_sm2.jpg
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2016 6:18 pm 
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Location: Utah
Thanks for the good information. I wonder why Pardini put the damping rod and 'O' ring springs in the bolt in the first place? Did you notice any change in felt recoil or bolt cycle time or sound? It does take quite a bit of force to compress the damper rod. That now all goes into the much larger area of the recoil cushion, which may be better.

Dave


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2017 1:26 pm 
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Location: Gainesville, Florida
Dave,
My guess is the dampening rod was a standard design feature of the basic SP model. It wasn't until about 2013 that Pardini began offering the 32 ACP, where the frame from the SPBE 22 could also be used for the 32 (otherwise, if you wanted to shoot the 32 S&W, you had to buy a whole new gun). It is much easier to lock open the bolt without the dampening rod in place. I haven't shot mine yet without it, but have noticed no difference in dry fire. I choose to believe I will now shoot better...Best, dipnet


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2017 10:27 am 
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Location: Maryland
Dear Dipnet and Dave, after removing part 770, the recoil dampening rod, have you any indication that the rear of the bolt is slamming too hard against the back of the frame? It seems very odd, as Dave mentioned, that Pardini would leave the part in when it damages the rubber recoil buffer. Or maybe they consider the recoil buffer pad to be a consumable, as you suggest with the recommendation to examine/replace at the end of a shooting season.

How much have you or Alex fired the gun with the rod removed? Have you seen any deformation to the rear of the bolt? Any stress cracking?

I just ordered a new SP and have yet to complete the waiting period, so have not received it. I am considering the removal of part 770 when I get the gun, based on what you report from Alex.

My concern stems from a Hammerli SP 20 that I've shot for more than 15 years. I am now on my FOURTH bolt on that gun as the first 3 cracked. Clearly it was a design error. But it makes me Leary of the effects of the bolt slamming against an inadequate recoil absorber. The design flaw had to do with the thinness of a part of the bolt near the extractor, all three bolts cracked in the same place.
Thanks for your posts, best regards
John C from Maryland


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2017 12:18 pm 
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Location: Gainesville, Florida
John,
I think the setup of the SPBE is the product of conjoining two different firearm designs, the SP and the HP. The SP has the recoil dampening rod and the HP does not. Before the SPBE, if you wanted to shoot 22rf and 32 S&WL, you needed to buy two pistols. When the SPBE was developed, they obviously started with the SP design and modified the barrel shroud to the 32 ACP and simply stuck them together. There have to be some differences between the two and an SP cannot be mated with a 32 ACP conversion kit. Maybe Pardini left the dampening rod in thinking American's might use all sorts of ammo in their guns, including high velocity stuff and the redundant system would be necessary.

I suspect Americans have done a lot of testing of the SPBE concept for Pardini.

I'll continue to monitor my rear recoil absorber and will likely keep a spare as they are easy to replace (using your 45 stuck-bullet dowel and a little grease). I've shot mine without the dampening rod and can tell no difference, except it is much easier to lock the barrel back now, which I like. I suspect other European target pistol makers would like to follow the 32 ACP example, but I believe there are laws in different countries not allowing the public to shoot military or police calibers. I had a 32 GSP and thought I could beat the slow twist by pushing a heavier bullet (98 gr.) faster to make it accurate at 50 yards, but it didn't work (and that was using Lapua brass and bullets), but I never got accuracy under the 9-ring.

I've heard of that problem with the SP 20, but thought it had been corrected (maybe I'm thinking of the frame?).

Life is so short and then we are dead for an extraordinarily long time. Treat yourself to some shooting joy. Best, dipnet


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