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A forum to talk about Olympic style shooting, rifle or pistol, 10 meters to 50 meters, and whatever is in between. Hosted by Pilkguns.com
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:35 pm 
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Is this 1911 series 80 platform used in bullseye 45's at all?


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jun 28, 2013 2:13 pm
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Yes. They aren't preferred because quality can be substandard on some; machining tolerances, loose frame/slide. The series 80 firing pin block really isn't a big deal. A good gunsmith can make it feel like it doesn't exist. I've shot 880's with series 80 in the past when I had one. They can be built as good as anything out there but can be extra work for the gunsmith.
Jon


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:57 am 
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Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 7:24 am
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Location: Zephyrhills, FL
I had a Series 80 Colt Gold Cup. The trigger worked just fine. Sometimes I think this is a mental issue. You know it's there, someone told you it's a problem, so your mind works against you. If you are an accomplished BE shooter, you can do just as well with the crappiest trigger around.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:25 pm 
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A High Master BE shooter would choose a marginally accurate pistol with an outstanding trigger over the most accurate pistol with a crappy trigger! Trigger is practically everything.
Jon


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 7:12 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:11 pm
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Location: Tennessee
I shot a Series 80 for a long time when I first started shooting BE. The gun was built by Clark Guns and shot very well. The trigger on the gum was very good and I doubt that most people could tell it was a series 80 by the feel of the trigger. It was a little more of a pain to clean if you stripped out the mechanism until you remembered what the assembly sequence was for the firing pin block. After learning that it is no more trouble than any other 1911.

_________________
RGw


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 12:37 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2011 2:47 pm
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Jon Eulette wrote:
A High Master BE shooter would choose a marginally accurate pistol with an outstanding trigger over the most accurate pistol with a crappy trigger! Trigger is practically everything.
Jon


"Your sights will get you into the black. Your trigger will get you into the X-Ring."

One of the military shooters at Camp Perry made this statement to a fellow league

shooter who attended the National Matches a few years ago.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:16 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2008 4:20 pm
Posts: 5093
Location: Scottsdale AZ
John Zurek was awarded a .45 (National Match?) for his performance at a match. He was planning to sell it (like he doesn't have enough of them), but we decided to put it in a Ransom Rest to find out what it would do.

It sucked. It wouldn't have mattered how good a trigger pull it had. The same thing happened with a Kimber .45 I'd picked up.

I guess if a gun doesn't have what it takes, trigger just don't matter.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:30 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2004 9:28 pm
Posts: 973
Location: Indiana
Murph wrote:
Is this 1911 series 80 platform used in bullseye 45's at all?
My advice is that if you already own one or can get one at a price that is a steal, go for it. Otherwise I'd get a basic series 70 type 1911, like the Springfield Armory Range Officer (http://www.springfield-armory.com/1911-series/). It's likely that any off the shelf pistol you buy will need some type of accurizing (some more than others). If you want to get a pistol ready to go to the line, I'd recommend something along the lines of a Rock River (https://www.rockriverarms.com/index.cfm ... N=63033482).


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:38 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:00 am
Posts: 39
It is also very easy to convert a Series 80 back to a 70. I recently rebuilt my Series 80 using a custom trigger kit from Brownells, a custom trigger from another source, and the required conversion shim, also from Brownells. There are several YouTube videos to show the process. I am no gunsmith, although no virgin either, when it comes to minor gunsmithing. The shim typically requires a bit of fitting, but otherwise, everything else pretty well drops into place, as long as you are not all thumbs. The trigger works great and breaks like glass at about 3 1/2 lbs.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:12 pm 
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Location: Rhode Island, USA
Westporter wrote:
It is also very easy to convert a Series 80 back to a 70. I recently rebuilt my Series 80 using a custom trigger kit from Brownells, a custom trigger from another source, and the required conversion shim, also from Brownells. There are several YouTube videos to show the process. I am no gunsmith, although no virgin either, when it comes to minor gunsmithing. The shim typically requires a bit of fitting, but otherwise, everything else pretty well drops into place, as long as you are not all thumbs. The trigger works great and breaks like glass at about 3 1/2 lbs.


This has gotten at least one competitor DQ'd at Camp Perry. It happened on Range 4 when I was CRO, so I know it's true. John Nortemann was the Referee.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2017 6:41 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2015 10:00 am
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I have no idea why that would be, given the countless variations of custom 1911s that are out there and used in competition. In fact, Colt itself has gone back to manufacturing the Series 70. But then I also have no knowledge of Camp Perry rules or referees. The fact remains that the Series 80 was an example of management listening to the legal department rather than the shooting fraternity who actually buys the guns. The conversion is just as safe as if it were manufactured that way in the first place.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2017 7:45 pm 
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Location: Rhode Island, USA
Westporter wrote:
I have no idea why that would be, given the countless variations of custom 1911s that are out there and used in competition. In fact, Colt itself has gone back to manufacturing the Series 70. But then I also have no knowledge of Camp Perry rules or referees. The fact remains that the Series 80 was an example of management listening to the legal department rather than the shooting fraternity who actually buys the guns. The conversion is just as safe as if it were manufactured that way in the first place.


The competitor disabled a factory-installed safety device. See Rule 3 of the NRA Precision Pistol Rules.


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