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 Post subject: Tennis elbow
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2004 6:36 am 
I am hurt from taking my son bowling. I was gripping the ball tightly with middle 2 fingers and in retrospect, throwing too hard. I am seeing a physician and trying to get into therapy before damage becomes permanent. Diagnosis was lateral epicondylitis or tennis elbow.
I didnt realize the injury at the time. I found a lack of grip strength a few days later as well as pain extending my arm and difficulty even holding a coffee mug.
NSAIDS (vioxx) help reduce pain but it comes back. Was advised to stretch before shooting and ice it down after. I am wearing one of those forearm aircast bands and that helps. The pain has moved from the outer elbow joint protrusion to a sensation of fire in the forearm.
What are your experiences and recommendations? Is the armband illegal for International but OK for NRA?
Thanks in advance
.50088.0


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 Post subject: Re: Tennis elbow
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2004 6:48 am 
NRA conventional pistol has an exemption for the brace. My last reading of the rules is that it is not acceptable for either NRA or USAS for international competition.
My tennis elbow was courtesy of rebuilding a deck for my mother-in-law. It took years to fully go away. Right now you should be following the doctor and physical therapist to the letter. Too many amateur athletes push to fast at their recovery and cause more damage than good. Long term, stretching exercises, properly done will restore some of your missing flexibility. Strength training along with the stretching eventually got rid of mine. No quick fixes that I know of. If it hurts, don't shoot.
: I am hurt from taking my son bowling. I was gripping the ball tightly with middle 2 fingers and in retrospect, throwing too hard. I am seeing a physician and trying to get into therapy before damage becomes permanent. Diagnosis was lateral epicondylitis or tennis elbow.
: I didnt realize the injury at the time. I found a lack of grip strength a few days later as well as pain extending my arm and difficulty even holding a coffee mug.
: NSAIDS (vioxx) help reduce pain but it comes back. Was advised to stretch before shooting and ice it down after. I am wearing one of those forearm aircast bands and that helps. The pain has moved from the outer elbow joint protrusion to a sensation of fire in the forearm.
: What are your experiences and recommendations? Is the armband illegal for International but OK for NRA?
: Thanks in advance

.50090.50088


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 Post subject: Re: Tennis elbow
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2004 9:13 am 
I had the same problem, different source.
The tennis elbow brace helped a lot, I was amazed that I could shoot and not hurt. But that is only masking the problem. w/o the brace, it hurt to hold up my AP to the point that I had to stop shooting.
I stopped shooting my AP for 6 months, and rested my arm. I went to the doc and went into a PT program, and did stretching, muscle strengthening and ice. Now I'm OK, not 100%, but good enough.
My advice, you've had an injury, rest your arm and recuperate. It won't recover if it is repeatedly put under stress.
gud luk
Gary
.50100.50088


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 Post subject: Re: Tennis elbow
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2004 9:17 am 
For pain relief, acuuncture worked for me as well as liberal use of Ibuprofen and ice packs. I use the Ibuprofen tablets and then also use Ibuprofen cream to rub into my elbow.
These remedies simply relieve the pain and shouldnt be used long term.
Good idea to get checked out first by the doc to see if you can isolate and minimize the cause.

.50101.50090


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 Post subject: Re: Tennis elbow
PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2004 11:08 am 
: I am seeing a physician and trying to get into therapy before damage becomes permanent.
Get it sorted, NOW. I tried to shoot through it, and it ended my competitive shooting career. Several years later I could hold a pistol again.

dalevene-at-blueyonder.co.uk.50109.50088


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2004 1:14 pm 
Aloha, Found this article on our Roadrunner website here. Hope it helps all of you.

Treating Tennis Elbow
by Stephenie Karony
Q) What causes tennis elbow and what are my options for treatment?
A) Lateral epicondylitis or elbow tendonitis is often referred to as
tennis elbow. Tennis elbow is an inflammation of the muscles and
tendons that attach at the elbow. It's usually caused by repetitive
stress to these muscles and tendons. In severe cases micro tearing
may also occur.
Tennis elbow can develop in anyone who uses the muscles that extend
the forearm excessively. Individuals whose work requires them to use
a tool repetitively are at a high risk of developing the conditions.
Among tennis players there are a number of possible causes: repeated
use of the backhand stroke, using a racket handle that's to small
for one's grip, gripping the racket handle too tightly, or having
strings that are too tight on the racket.
There is also another similar joint disorder called medial
epicondylitis. The most common name for this condition is golfer's
elbow or pitcher's elbow. The main cause of this condition is
excessive stress on the wrist forearm muscles combined with repeated
tension on the elbow joint. Golfers, pitchers and racquetball
players are at a high risk of medial epicondylitis. This condition
is associated more with sport activity than is tennis elbow. Of the
two, tennis elbow is more common than golfer's elbow because tennis
elbow is often attributed to job related joint stress.
Symptoms of both lateral and medial epicondylitis are the same. The
elbow hurts. The pain can even radiate down the forearm, and if you
don't take immediate steps to fix the problem, it will intensify
with continued use. The pain is sometimes accompanied by swelling
and/or tenderness in the elbow area. If the condition is left
untreated, movements such as flexing or extending the wrist, as in
picking up a cup of coffee, can become difficult. At its worst the
joint will hurt, become inflamed and a feeling of catching or
sticking may even develop. You're in real trouble if you let it go
this far.
Treating Tennis Elbow
General treatment of both disorders is as follows; Avoid all
activities that aggravate the affected area. Ice the elbow joint for
20 minutes, several times throughout the day; this helps control the
pain and inflammation. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory is also
recommended. When the swelling subsides, start doing some simple
range of motion exercises. Once the pain is gone it's time to start
some strength and flexibility exercises. It's at this point that
you'll need to follow some specific guidelines, from a doctor,
physical therapist, or other qualified professional, because healing
protocols vary depending on the type and severity of the injury.
Your return to activity should be slow. Increase your activity level
only as tolerated. If you jump back in at the level you were at when
the injury occurred, re-injury is almost certain.
There are a variety of devices that can be worn to help protect the
elbow joint. Braces, sleeves, joint wraps, and air bands can all
help alleviate the stress placed on the muscles that insert at the
elbow.
Of course the best way to avoid major problems is to prevent them
from occurring in the first place. But if they do occur, early
detection and treatment is your first line of defense. Always
maintain good form when moving the elbow and wrist; faulty movement
mechanics are often at the heart of these types of injuries. Develop
strong muscles in the arm, and keep those muscle limber with regular
stretching routines. Allow your body to rest as much as your
situation permits. And remember, if you enable an overuse injury to
re-establish itself , you'll be setting the stage for a lifelong
chronic problem.


newsphotohi-at-hawaii.rr.com.50115.50088


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2004 6:11 pm 
: I am hurt from taking my son bowling. I was gripping the ball tightly with middle 2 fingers and in retrospect, throwing too hard. I am seeing a physician and trying to get into therapy before damage becomes permanent. Diagnosis was lateral epicondylitis or tennis elbow.
: I didnt realize the injury at the time. I found a lack of grip strength a few days later as well as pain extending my arm and difficulty even holding a coffee mug.
: NSAIDS (vioxx) help reduce pain but it comes back. Was advised to stretch before shooting and ice it down after. I am wearing one of those forearm aircast bands and that helps. The pain has moved from the outer elbow joint protrusion to a sensation of fire in the forearm.
: What are your experiences and recommendations? Is the armband illegal for International but OK for NRA?
: Thanks in advance

makofoto-at-earthlink.net.50129.50088


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 Post subject: Re: Tennis elbow
PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2004 9:33 am 
To clarify my post from yesterday, the creme\topical ointment I use is called Aspercreme (not Ibuprofen).
The active ingredient in Aspercreme is actually Trolamine Salicylate (10%)
Recently someone also sugggested to me that I try Glucosamine & Chondroitin 1500/1200
mg per day.
This is an all natural compound made from shellfish. If you have any reaction to seafood, nevermind.
The Glucosamine works on repairing the joint tissue, the Chondroiton provides
lubrication to your joints. Many people report improvements within 6 weeks.
It is an overthecounter food supplement you can get at any good pharmacy or GNC type outlet.
Paul



: For pain relief, acuuncture worked for me as well as liberal use of Ibuprofen and ice packs. I use the Ibuprofen tablets and then also use Ibuprofen cream to rub into my elbow.
: These remedies simply relieve the pain and shouldnt be used long term.
: Good idea to get checked out first by the doc to see if you can isolate and minimize the cause.


.50161.50101


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 Post subject: Re: Tennis elbow
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2004 8:54 am 
I had the very same problem with a pain that originated in the forarm (Flexor) around to the elbow. This could become excruciating extending my arm with some weight and making a fist. I injured myself overtraining with the original,heavier IZH-46 (ca. 96) that was very nose heavy.
I visited a physical terrorist that had me doing the very same thing that caused the injury with wrist weights and barbels. Slowly raising my arm and moving the barbel in and out to flex my wrist. She insisted that it was to stretch the tendons. Another was to pull on a coloured,rubber band from several directions with an outstretched arm. I couldn't seem to impress that this exact motion is what caused the injury. The therapy was preceded with a hot pack and ended with an ice pack. The only drug that my phyician recommended was Naproxyn/Alleve. This was all nonsense and it was getting much worse, so I quit at the advice of my physician. It took about 3 months for the resting pain to subside and about another 3 months before I could lift a pistol without feeling anything significant.
I'm positive that it was primarly because of the nose heavy IZH-46. Gripping the pistol and sighting caused the severest pain when I would beging to raise the front sight and begin my trigger pull. Had the pistol had rake correction to set my NPA, those muscles/tendons probably wouldn't have become stressed/injured.
dfs
.50202.50088


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 Post subject: Tennis elbow and PT
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2004 2:55 pm 
I can empathise with you. Some of those PT don't belong in the job. I had one cause a reinjury of my back. I dropped him immediately and never went back. I finally found a good PT, and I'm hanging on to her for dear life.
My PT was very good about shooting. She had me bring in my air rifle and air pistol so they could help me work out a SAFE way for me to shoot w/o causing reinjury.
My PT and her assistant recommened that I get an air pistol like the Steyr, where the vertical angle of the grip is adjustable. And to adjust the grip to be more upright, to reduce the tension in the forearm tendon. The other option is to have the grip custom made for a more upright grip.
If you are injured, the doc should have you resting, not doing PT. Although based on my experience, sometimes PT is part of the healing process.
I think recuperation is the primary role of PT.
In my PT, the stretching excercises was always separate from the strengthening exercises. Strength exercises was not done to endpoints, almost always in the middle of your range of motion, with a few exceptions. Stretching exercises is at the very end point of your range of motion.
The tendon does have to be stretched, but it should be done GRADUALLY, so as to not cause reinjury.
The forearm tendon stretch I was taught was, to bend the wrist down and bend and reach your fingers toward your elbow. Put the back of your hand on a table and SLOWLY push down, stretching the tendon. But only push till you feel a stretch...NO PAIN. If it hurts at all...back off. As it stretches you can push more. Hold for 30 sec, switch to the other arm, repeat back and forth. Gradually over time the tendon stretches.
There is the school where they use force to push the tendons and muscles, to stretch faster. But the risk is to tear or damage an already injured tissue.
If it is injured...gradual stretch. If you are NOT injured, then forced stretching can work, but it could also tear tissue.
At the same time you are stretching the tendon, you also need to strengthen the muscles. As I was taught, the stronger muscles is needed to help compensate for the injured tissue.
For strengthening exercises, use light weights and low resistance rubber bands. As you get stronger, then up the weight and resistance. Again...NO PAIN. pain = injury
The too young PTs, especially the guys, tend to over do things and push you, they don't know what it feels like to be hurt. You also need to push back and tell them when it hurts. pain = injury.

Me thinks you need to find a new Physical Therapist.
gud luk
Gary
.50211.50202


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